Bazile Creek NE, Elk Point SD, Sioux Point SD, Sioux City IA, Ponca Tribal Designated Statistical Area

known Primeau locale 1825-1863
locations, from west > east
White Paint (now Bazile) Creek, Nebraska Paul Primaut visited in 1804 as an engagé with Lewis & Clark.
["White Paint Creek of Lewis and Clerk; L'Eau qui Monte of P. du Lac; Wasiska of Nicollet. It is now known as Bazile Creek. It flows into the Missour in Knox County, Nebraska. note 71, Luttig's journal, Stella Drumm] (Paul, father of Charles Primeau)

P. Premo signed 1825 US-Ponca treaty here (P. = Pierre?, older brother of Paul)

Santee Reservation & Ponca tribal-designated statistical area

Elk Point,
South Dakota
Leon Primeau born 1856
son of Charles Primeau & Mary Louise Cyr
Sioux Point,
South Dakota
Robear Primeau settled here ca 1850?
The early settlements of Union County mostly concentrated around Elk Point, and Sioux Point at the junction of the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers. At this last named locality were a number of French Canadians, some of whom had previously resided at other places in the United States. Most of them were allied with the Indians by marriage and raised large families. Some engaged in stock-raising, but the greater number were hunters and trappers, who built log cabins in some sheltered spot, and perhaps cultivated a few acres in corn and vegetables.
The following, as near as can be ascertained are the names of those who settled at Sioux Point: J. B. LaPlant, John B. McBride, Peter Arpin, J. Chattellion, Adolphe Mason, Antoine Fleury, ____ Primeau. There were several others whose names are not recollected. Several of these, among whom was LaPlant, located as early as 1848 or 1849. The latter is now in Charles Mix County, and the others have removed to various parts of the West.
- Union County, in Andreas' Historical Atlas of Dakota by Alfred Theodore Andreas, Chicago 1884

Joseph La Plant settled at Big Sioux Point in 1849. John Brughier came to Fort Pierre in 1836. He located near the mouth of the Big Sioux River in May, 1849. John C. McBride, Christopher Maloney, Antoine Fleury, Adolph Mason, Robear Primeau, Archie Christy, Gustav Christy and James Somers were of this settlement prior to the organization of Dakota Territory. Paul Paquette settled on the Big Sioux in 1854, and operated a ferry.
- Early history of North Dakota: essential outlines of American history by Clement Augustus Lounsberry 1919 p 220
(also spelled Robear Primeaup in History of Dakota Territory Chicago 1915)

- what is Robear's relationship with Robert Primeau aka Big Elk, son of Antoine Primeaux aka Lone Chief? - are they the same person?

Sioux City,
Iowa
Mary Louise Primeau born 1863
daughter of Charles Primeau & Mary Louise Cyr
The Catholics held mass here in 1857, but did not establish a church until 1862.
St. Mary's Catholic church was organized in 1863.

tribes of Nebraska

Sioux Point's earliest non-indian settlers according to Andreas:
... 5 of the 7 are found in the Dakota Territory, 1860 Census:

J. B. LaPlant: Jno. B Laplant - John B Laplant, 5 others, b 1823 Indiana
John B. McBride: John McBride, 5 others, trader, b 1830 Scotland
Peter Arpin: ?
J. Chattellion: Joseph Chatillin, 8 others, farmer, b 1807 Michigan
Adolphe Mason: Adolphus Mason, single, farmer, b 1818 Canada
Antoine Fleury: single, farmer, b 1835 Canada
____ Primeau: Robear Primeau, in Early History of North Dakota, Lounsberry 1919


Page No. 104
Schedule 1.--Free Inhabitants in Between Big Sioux and Big Stone Lake
Unorganized State Minnesota - 5th day of Sept 1860.
Post Office Sioux City Iowa

... later known as Sioux Point, Union County, South Dakota.
(In 1860 Minnesota Territory contained the area now known as the states of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.)
This index was created by tom kunesh from the original 1860 census graphic image available on www.footnote.com:
Census - US Federal 1860 > Unorganized Territory > Between Big Sioux And Big Stone Lake > Page 104.
Copyright 2008tpkunesh - This file may be copied for non-profit uses. Citation requested.

Dwelling          Family              Age   Sex   Color     Profession/Trade     Birthplace

1036 950 Adolphus Mason 42 M Farmer Canada
1038 952 Jno B Laplant 37 M Farmer Indiana Mary 21 F Dakota John 5 M Nebraska Joseph 3 M Iowa Lewis 2 M Dakota Mary 9/12 F Do [ditto]
1039 953 Eubert Le Fleur 40 M Farmer Canada Antoine Fleury 25 M Do [ditto]
1042 956 Joseph Chatillin 53 M Hunter Missouri Mary Angie 40 F Farmer Michigan Victoria Anne 21 F Dakota Harriet 19 F Do Nicholas 15 M Do Josette 12 F Do Thomas 10 M Minnesota Helene 8 F Do Matilda 5 F Iowa Salimina Kanna 4 F Ind Do Michaud " 8 M Dakota
1044 958 John McBride 30 M Trader Scotland Susan 23 F Dakota Mary Anne 8 F Dakota James 6 M Dakota John 4 M Dakota Robert 10/12 M Dakota

Dakota Territory 1860 Census: no variation of cerre, cyr, premo, premeaux, primo, primeau, primeaux,

1910 Big Sioux Township map: see property belonging to Anthony Fluria Sr (Antoine Fleury), northeast Section 21

1862 Old Settlers Association chartered by state legislature, included C.F. Picotte, J.C. McBride, J.B. LaPlant, A. Mason, Peter Arpin, Joseph Chattelion.
- Early History of North Dakota by Clement Augustus Lounsberry, p 282
no mention of Fleury or Primeau.

Early History of North Dakota: Essential Outlines of American History by Clement Augustus Lounsberry 1919

Page 220 John C. McBride, Christopher Maloney, Antoine Fleury, Adolph Mason, Robear Primeau, Archie Christy, Gustav Christy and James Somers were of this settlement ...
Page 236 Charles Primeau, who was a clerk for the American Fur Company at Fort Union in 1831, had a brother who was killed by Indians at Apple Creek in 1832. ...
Page 238 Joseph Picotte, nephew of Honore Picotte, was a member of the firm of Primeau, Picotte & Boosie, independent traders, supplied by Robert Campbell of St. ...
Page 643 ... 384, 386 Power, JB, 334, 526 Primeau, Picotte & Boosie, 238 Presbyterian Church organized, 615 Presbyterianism in North Dakota, 615 to 626 Prohibition, ...

p 220: The Settlement at Elk Point
Eli B. Wixson came to Dakota in 1859, and July 22 settled at a place he named Elk Point, and built a large log hotel. The name was given by the Indians on account of a runway for elk between two points of timber.

Other Settlements
...
Joseph La Plant settled at Big Sioux Point in 1849. John Brughier came to Fort Pierre in 1836. He located near the mouth of the Big Sioux River in May, 1849. John C. McBride, Christopher Maloney, Antoine Fleury, Adolph Mason, Robear Primeau, Archie Christy, Gustav Christy and James Somers were of this settlement prior to the organization of Dakota Territory. Paul Paquette settled on the Big Sioux in 1854, and operated a ferry.
...
George Stickney and family came to Elk Point in 1860, Mrs. Stickney being the first white woman to take up her abode there.
...
p 221: The Ponca Agency
This agency was the first settlement west of the Missouri River. Among the settlers at the Agency and in the vicinity, 1858 to 1861, were ... [no name that i recognize].

p 222: Charles F. Picotte
Perhaps no name deserves more consideration in the early history of the Dakotas than that of Charles F. Picotte, son of Honore Picotte and the daughter of Two Lance, known to the early settlers of the Missouri slope as Mrs. Major Galpin, a full-blooded Sioux, her father a brave and influential chief. When eight years of age young Picotte was placed in charge of the Rev. Father Peter John DeSmet, the Belgian missionary, who sent him to a boarding school at St. Joseph, Mo., where he remainedfourteen years, acquired a liberal education in French and English, and, returning to his tribe at twenty-two, was employed by his step-father in trade with the Indians.

p 234: Others Identified with Dakota prior to 1861
...
p 235: Louis Aagard came to Fort Pierre in 1844 and was at Fort clark under Joseph des Autel, with the American Fur Company, in 1846-47, an interpreter for the Peace Commission at Fort Rice in 1868, and a rancher in 1873 at Aagard Bottoms, near Bismarck.
...
p 236: Charles Primeau, who was a clerk for the American Fur Company at Fort Union in 1831, had a brother who was killed by Indians at Apple Creek in 1832. He established a trading post above Fort Clark, whihc he sold to Hawley & Hubbell. Two years later that firm abandoned Fort Primeau and it was occupied by the American Fur Company, Gerard having charge of the post from 1857 to 1859. He was at Fort Berthold December 25, 1863, when that post was attacked by Two Bears' band of Sioux, as was also Charles Malnouri, who came there in 1860.
In 1869 Gerard ...
David Pease was a partner with Hawley & Hubbel at Fort Berthold ...
Charles Primeau was interpreter at Fort Yates and died in 1897.

p 237: His [Galpin] title of "major" was acquired from the fact that army officers assigned to take charge of Indian agencies were usually of the rank of major, and the Indian traders and military post-traders became majors by courtesy.

p 238: Joseph Picotte, nephew of Honore Picotte, was a member of the firm of Primeau, Picotte & Boosie, independent traders, supplied by Robert Campbell of St. Louis.

p 181 In 1843 the Omega was the American Fur Company's annual boat, carrying supplies for the Yellowstone trade. Joseph A. Sire was master, with Joseph La Barge at the wheel.

no Cerre, Primo

p 47: FIrst Family Names
The family names of nearly every mixed-blood family, now or recently residing in the Turtle Mountains, may be found among the employees of the several fur companies operating on the Red River or in that region. Among those mentioed by Alexander Henry n connection with the fur trade in the Red River country are the following:
... Andrew Poitras, Duncan Pollock, Joseph Premeau, John Roy Ross, Augustin Ross, Jean Baptiste Ross, Vincent Ross, John Sayers, Angus Shaw, Alex Wilkie. ...

p 167: The Columbia Fur Company
When the Hudson's Bay and North-West companies consolidated in 1821, about nine hundred men were thrown out of employment, and a number of these sought connection with American companies. The Columbia Fur Company was organized by Joseph Renville, a trader found on the Minnesota River by Pike's expedition in 1805, from men experienced in the fur trade. Though having a small capital, with headquarters at Lake Traverse, on the northeast border of South Dakota, where Renville had been engaged in trade previous to the War of 1812, they established a line of posts on the Missouri River in 1822; among the number Fort Tecumseh at the mouth of Bad River, in Central South Dakota--afterwards changed in location and named Fort Pierre, occupying land across the river from Pierre, the capital of South Dakota. The Premeau House was located on the west side of the Missour near the present North Dakota state line, Fort Defiance established by discharged employees of the American Fur Company being known as Harvey, Premeau & Company, was located at the mouth of Medicine Knoll Creek, which is northeast of Pierre six miles above the Big Bend of the Missouri. There were, also, Fourt Bouis, at the mouth of the Cannonball, and Mitchell's Post, near the present site of Bismarck on the land afterwards entered as a homestead by J.O. Simmons. They also has a post near Mandan, on the Heart River, where there were large Indian villages, abandoned as a result of war with the Sioux and disease; the remaining Indians removing up t the Knife River where they were followed by the traders. Licenses were issued for the Arikara villages and for the Heart River as late as 1831.
...
The trading posts were called "forts" because they were almost invariably fortified, in order to guard against attack, and to afford shelter to friendly Indians, who might come to the fort to trade, if pursued by their enemies. There were usually two bastions or block-houses on diagonal corners, built of logs or stone, equipped with both artillery and musketry, so arranged that every front could be raked by the fire from the fort, in case of attack.

Page 172
In 1845, new opposition having developed, in the firm of Harvey, Premeau & Company, he returned to Fort Union and remained until the following spring. ...

p 178: Chardon scarcely dared go beyond the gates of the fort after that, and the post was finally abandoned; the company feeling obliged to dispense with the services of Harvey, who established an opposition company known as Harvey, Premeau & Company, in 1845, as state, with headquarters at Fort Defiance, previously mentioned as located six miles above the Big Bend of the Missouri, and continued in business several years.

P. X. Promo :: P Premo :: Pierre Primeau with the Ponca 1825
Ponca chiefs named Primeau

tom kunesh september 2008